Turmeric: Experiments and Experiences…

TRUTH to be told, I am not a big fan on turmeric, mainly due to its bitter taste and lasting colour on anything that came in contact with this spice – be it our skin or clothes.

For the uninitiated, and I know, not that many, turmeric is a spice that comes from the turmeric plant. It is commonly used in Asian cooking.

But my view about turmeric changed 360 degree when Adam was involved in horrible accident in January.

We tried modern and conventional method to help heal his lacerations – big and small – by going to hospital and private clinic for that dreadful “dressing” trips…

But as his mother I really hate that process. Knowing how much painful it was to get your open raw skin cleaned and medicated. And the process needed to be repeated. Not that often but enough to make me cringe…

After asking around with a few trial and errors… including consuming the freshwater snakehead fish (either made into soup or deep fried or grilled – which normally worked just fine on mothers who had just giving birth or those who had internal injuries) we finally found something looked “friendlier” and didn’t need Adam to consume something he didn’t like in nature and wouldn’t cause as much as pain as in doing the dressing at the clinics…

Yes. Turmeric. 

What we needed to do was to select a few fresh turmeric (roots), washed and put them in your mixer/blender ( and mixed it with a bit of water) until it was smooth in texture. Then “cook” the mixture together with a small amount of palm oil or any cooking oil until it was properly cooked and emitted that “cooked” turmeric smell.

Let it cool and then scoop the mixture (minus the excess oil) and paste them on the wounds and leave it on – from few hours to over night – and then clean them up next with cotton pads and apply the mixture again. Repeat the process for the next  couple of rounds and the next thing you know, the wounds will heal nicely…

Yes! Adam’s wounds healed nicely… And I couldn’t be happier and I was sure Adam was very happy too. Not having to go through the pain associated with cleaning up open wounds or cuts with water or chemical… Though he had to bear of having “yellowish” skins around the wounds for the next few days. It was nothing really…

Yes we had to throw away a few stuff such as bed covers and pillow cases after the process as they were all completely unusable. But l made a point of using old bed covers and pillow cases knowing that the turmeric would leave undesirable colours on those things.

That’s my personal experience I have had with turmeric beyond what it was universally known for years…

We probably know turmeric as the main spice in curry. It has a warm, bitter taste and is frequently used to flavour or colour curry powders, mustards, butters, and cheeses. But the root of turmeric is also used widely to make medicine. It contains a yellow-coloured chemical called curcumin, which is often used to colour foods and cosmetics.

From my reading on this plant…among known use of turmeric are to treat  arthritis, heartburn (dyspepsia), joint pain, stomach pain, Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, bypass surgery, hemorrhage, diarrhea, intestinal gas, stomach bloating, loss of appetite, jaundice, liver problems, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, stomach ulcers, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), gallbladder disorders, high cholesterol, a skin condition called lichen planus, skin inflammation from radiation treatment, and fatigue. 

It is also reported to have been used to treat headaches, bronchitis, colds, lung infections, fibromyalgia, leprosy, fever, menstrual problems, itchy skin, recovery after surgery, and cancers. Other turmeric benefits apparently include depression, Alzheimer’s disease, swelling in the middle layer of the eye (anterior uveitis), diabetes, water retention, worms, an autoimmune disease called systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), tuberculosis, urinary bladder inflammation, and kidney problems.

Some people apply turmeric to the skin for acne (tried this when l was in my late tern and it worked!), pain, ringworm, sprains and swellings, bruising, leech bites, eye infections, acne, inflammatory skin conditions and skin sores, soreness inside of the mouth, infected wounds, and gum disease.

Turmeric is also used as an enema for people with inflammatory bowel disease.

In food and manufacturing, the essential oil of turmeric is used in perfumes, and its resin is used as a flavour and colour component in foods.

But don’t confuse turmeric with Javanese turmeric root (Curcuma zedoaria) though and I am still trying to find out more about the latter… But till then I am very thankful for God’s creation called turmeric… It saved my son from the unnecessary pain and scars… A